Corylus avellana 'Contorta' at Roath Park Botanic Garden

Corylus avellana 'Contorta' 0

Corylus avellana 'Contorta'
late July 2018

Corylus avellana 'Contorta' 1

Corylus avellana 'Contorta'
late December 2018

Grid reference ST 18521 78981
Common name Corkscrew hazel
Common name Harry Lauder's walking stick
Origin Europe and N. Africa
Deciduous Yes
Height 5M July 2018
Girth Multi-stem
Reference 569

This tree is almost opposite the entrance to the conservatory.

Corylus avellana 'Contorta' bark

Corylus avellana 'Contorta' bark
late July 2018

Corylus avellana 'Contorta' leaf1

Corylus avellana 'Contorta' leaves
late July 2018

Corylus avellana 'Contorta' leaf

Corylus avellana 'Contorta' leaf
late July 2018

Corylus avellana 'Contorta' fruit1

Corylus avellana 'Contorta' young fruit
late July 2018

Corylus avellana 'Contorta' catkin

Corylus avellana 'Contorta' catkins
late December 2018

Corylus avellana 'Contorta' flower

Corylus avellana 'Contorta' female flower not open
mid February 2019

Corylus avellana 'Contorta' flower2

Corylus avellana 'Contorta' female flower not open
mid February 2019

Corylus avellana 'Contorta' flower3

Corylus avellana 'Contorta' female flower
mid February 2019

General tree description for Corylus avellana 'Contorta'

Corylus avellana 'Contorta' is a variant of the native Common hazel (Corylus avellana) with twisted branches and curled leaves. It commonly grows slowly to around 3 metres tall and was discovered in Gloucestershire c.1863 growing in a hedgerow. Other than the highly contorted branches and leaves the most striking feature is the drooping, yellow, male catkins in late winter and early spring.

General tree description for Corylus avellana

Corylus avellana is a large, spreading shrub or small multi-stemmed tree. Old plants can grow up to 15 metres tall, but around 8 metres is more usual. When mature the bark is pale brown with shallow ridges. The leaves are roundish, 12 cm across, heart-shaped at the base, the lower part irregularly toothed and the tip ending in a sharp point. They turn yellow in autumn and both surfaces are downy. In late winter and early spring there are drooping, yellow catkins 3 to 6 cm long, followed by edible nuts which ripen in autumn. These are 2 cm long, enclosed in husks of similar length.